6 Possible Causes of Low Body Temperature

Low Body Temperature: You might feel ill and take your temperature, thinking you have a fever. Your thermometer instead reads 96°F (35.55°C). This lower-than-average temperature could be caused by a number of factors. You could be suffering from a cold-related illness. It’s possible that you took your temperature incorrectly. Age could be a factor. Finally, you could be suffering from a medical condition that is causing your body temperature to drop.

To make sense of your 96-degree reading, you must first understand your body temperature. Doctors used to consider 98.6°F (37°C) to be a “normal” temperature. In recent years, this has shifted. A normal temperature is now considered to be slightly lower than that, depending on your age and the method used to measure your temperature.

6 Possible Causes of Low Body Temperature

Are you always cold? Do you have a low body temperature? If so, you’re not alone. In fact, low body temperature is a common problem, especially in women.

There are a number of possible causes of low body temperature, including:

1. An under active thyroid gland.

The thyroid gland is responsible for regulating the body’s metabolism. If it isn’t functioning properly, the body’s metabolism can slow down, leading to a low body temperature.

2. Poor blood circulation.

Poor blood circulation can cause the body to lose heat, resulting in a low body temperature.

3. Exposure to cold temperatures.

If you’re frequently exposed to cold temperatures, your body temperature can drop.

4. Certain medications.

Certain medications, such as beta blockers and antipsychotics, can cause a low body temperature.

5. An underlying medical condition.

There are a number of medical conditions that can cause a low body temperature, such as hypothyroidism, anemia, and diabetes.

6. Aging.

As we age, our bodies become less efficient at regulating temperature, which can lead to a low body temperature.

If you have a low body temperature, it’s important to see your doctor to rule out any underlying medical conditions. Once the cause is determined, treatment can be initiated.

What Does Having Low Body Temperature Mean?

A low body temperature can be caused by a variety of factors. The most common cause is simply being cold, but a low body temperature can also be caused by a number of medical conditions.

Hypothermia, which occurs when your body loses heat faster than it can generate it, is one of the most common medical causes of a low body temperature. Exposure to cold weather or immersion in cold water can both cause hypothermia. Certain medical conditions, such as heart failure or stroke, can also contribute to it.

Hypothyroidism, a condition in which the thyroid gland does not produce enough of the hormone thyroxine, is another medical cause of a low body temperature. This hormone aids in the regulation of your body’s temperature.

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A low body temperature can also be caused by a variety of non-medical factors. If you’ve been drinking alcohol, for example, your body temperature will drop. Your body temperature will also drop if you are dehydrated.

So, what does a low body temperature imply?

Depending on the cause, it can mean a variety of things. It’s nothing to be concerned about if you’re just cold. However, if you have a medical condition that causes your body temperature to drop, you should see a doctor so that the condition can be treated.

When to See a Doctor?

It’s cold outside, and you’re feeling a little under the weather. You’re probably not sure if you should tough it out or see a doctor. So, when is it time to see a doctor if you have a low body temperature?

First, it’s important to know what your normal body temperature is. For most people, a normal body temperature is around 98.6°F (37°C). But, keep in mind that normal body temperature can vary depending on age, activity level, and the time of day.

 body temperature can be affected by many things, including:

  • Age: Babies and young children have a higher body temperature than adults.
  • Activity level: People who are more active tend to have a higher body temperature than people who are less active.
  • Time of day: Body temperature is usually highest in the late afternoon and early evening.

That said, there are a few times when you should see a doctor even if your body temperature is within the normal range.

For example, you should see a doctor if your body temperature is:

  • Above 100.4°F (38°C)
  • Below 95°F (35°C)
  • Unusually high or low for you

You should also see a doctor if you have other symptoms along with a low body temperature, such as:

  • Shivering
  • Feeling very weak or tired
  • Confusion
  • Slurred speech
  • Trouble breathing
  • Chest pain
  • Abdominal pain
  • Numbness or tingling in the extremities

If you’re not sure whether or not you should see a doctor, it’s always best to err on the side of caution and give your doctor a call. They can help you figure out whether or not you need to be seen and, if so, can help you get the care you need.

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